SOLUBLE FACTOR(S) PRODUCED IN INJURED FISH OPTIC-NERVE REGULATE THE POSTINJURY NUMBER OF OLIGODENDROCYTES - POSSIBLE ROLE OF MACROPHAGES

Autor(en): SIVRON, T
COHEN, A
HIRSCHBERG, DL
JESERICH, G
SCHWARTZ, M
Stichwörter: CYTOTOXIC FACTORS; Neurosciences; Neurosciences & Neurology; REGENERATION
Erscheinungsdatum: 1991
Herausgeber: WILEY
Journal: GLIA
Volumen: 4
Ausgabe: 6
Startseite: 591
Seitenende: 601
Zusammenfassung: 
Mammalian central nervous system (CNS) axons are virtually incapable of regenerating after injury. However, CNS neurons of lower vertebrates, such as fish and amphibians, are endowed with a high regenerative capacity. Lately, the glial cells have been credited with the regenerative ability of any specific CNS. We have previously demonstrated that many oligodendrocytes are recovered in cultures of injured rat optic nerve, while only a few oligodendrocytes are recovered from injured fish optic nerve in culture. We further demonstrated that medium conditioned by regenerating fish optic nerves (CM), which has been shown to cause axonal elongation in injured rabbit optic nerves, causes a decrease in the number of oligodendrocytes in rat glial cultures. In the present study, we demonstrate that soluble factors in the CM are capable of reducing the number of fish oligodendrocytes in fish optic nerve cultures. In addition, an inverse relationship was found between the number of macrophages and the number of oligodendrocytes. These results thus suggest that macrophages and/or activated resident microglial cells are directly or indirectly responsible for the presence of these soluble factor(s) that regulate the postinjury number of oligodendrocytes in the fish optic nerves.
ISSN: 08941491
DOI: 10.1002/glia.440040606

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