Oscillatory signatures of crossmodal congruence effects: An EEG investigation employing a visuotactile pattern matching paradigm

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoeschl, Florian
dc.contributor.authorFriese, Uwe
dc.contributor.authorDaume, Jonathan
dc.contributor.authorKoenig, Peter
dc.contributor.authorEngel, Andreas K.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:13:05Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:13:05Z-
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn10538119
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/10399-
dc.description.abstractCoherent percepts emerge from the accurate combination of inputs from the different sensory systems. There is an ongoing debate about the neurophysiological mechanisms of crossmodal interactions in the brain, and it has been proposed that transient synchronization of neurons might be of central importance. Oscillatory activity in lower frequency ranges (<30 Hz) has been implicated in mediating long-range communication as typically studied in multisensory research. In the current study, we recorded high-density electroencephalograms while human participants were engaged in a visuotactile pattern matching paradigm and analyzed oscillatory power in the theta-(4-7 Hz), alpha-(8-13 Hz) and beta-bands (13-30 Hz). Employing the same physical stimuli, separate tasks of the experiment either required the detection of predefined targets in visual and tactile modalities or the explicit evaluation of crossmodal stimulus congruence. Analysis of the behavioral data showed benefits for congruent visuotactile stimulus combinations. Differences in oscillatory dynamics related to crossmodal congruence within the two tasks were observed in the beta-band for crossmodal target detection, as well as in the theta-band for congruence evaluation. Contrasting ongoing activity preceding visuotactile stimulation between the two tasks revealed differences in the alpha-and beta-bands. Source reconstruction of between-task differences showed prominent involvement of premotor cortex, supplementary motor area, somatosensory association cortex and the supramarginal gyrus. These areas not only exhibited more involvement in the pre-stimulus interval for target detection compared to congruence evaluation, but were also crucially involved in post-stimulus differences related to crossmodal stimulus congruence within the detection task. These results add to the increasing evidence that low frequency oscillations are functionally relevant for integration in distributed brain networks, as demonstrated for crossmodal interactions in visuotactile pattern matching in the current study. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.description.sponsorshipGerman Research FoundationGerman Research Foundation (DFG) [SFB 936/A3/B6]; European UnionEuropean Commission [ERC-2010-AdG-269716]; This research was supported by grants from the German Research Foundation (SFB 936/A3/B6) and the European Union (ERC-2010-AdG-269716) awarded to A.K.E. and P.K. The authors thank Julia Diestel for the assistance in data recording, Till Schneider for the helpful discussions on previous versions of the manuscript and Guido Nolte, Arne Ewald and Peng Wang for their methodological counseling.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
dc.relation.ispartofNEUROIMAGE
dc.subjectALPHA-ACTIVITY
dc.subjectAUDITORY OBJECT RECOGNITION
dc.subjectCORTICAL NETWORKS
dc.subjectCortical oscillations
dc.subjectCrossmodal congruence
dc.subjectENHANCEMENT
dc.subjectFEATURE INTEGRATION
dc.subjectGAMMA-BAND RESPONSES
dc.subjectIMPROVES VISUAL-PERCEPTION
dc.subjectMODULATION
dc.subjectMultisensory integration
dc.subjectNeuroimaging
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectNeurosciences & Neurology
dc.subjectPattern matching
dc.subjectRadiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
dc.subjectSIMPLE REACTION-TIME
dc.subjectSYNCHRONIZATION
dc.subjectVisuotactile
dc.titleOscillatory signatures of crossmodal congruence effects: An EEG investigation employing a visuotactile pattern matching paradigm
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.03.067
dc.identifier.isiISI:000355930200017
dc.description.volume116
dc.description.startpage177
dc.description.endpage186
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-4899-8466
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-3654-5267
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-4899-8466
dc.contributor.researcheridAAH-6384-2019
dc.contributor.researcheridABB-2380-2020
dc.contributor.researcheridC-7781-2012
dc.identifier.eissn10959572
dc.publisher.place525 B ST, STE 1900, SAN DIEGO, CA 92101-4495 USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationNeuroimage
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Submitted
crisitem.author.deptUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.deptInstitut für Kognitionswissenschaft-
crisitem.author.deptUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.deptInstitut für Kognitionswissenschaft-
crisitem.author.deptFB 05 - Biologie/Chemie-
crisitem.author.deptUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.deptidinstitute28-
crisitem.author.deptidinstitute28-
crisitem.author.deptidfb05-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0002-6516-7288-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-3654-5267-
crisitem.author.parentorgFB 08 - Humanwissenschaften-
crisitem.author.parentorgFB 08 - Humanwissenschaften-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.grandparentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.grandparentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidGoFl002-
crisitem.author.netidFrUw182-
crisitem.author.netidDaJo001-
crisitem.author.netidKoPe298-
crisitem.author.netidEnAn001-
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