SLC1 glutamate transporters

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrewer, Christof
dc.contributor.authorGameiro, Armanda
dc.contributor.authorRauen, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:13:24Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:13:24Z-
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn00316768
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/10555-
dc.description.abstractThe plasma membrane transporters for the neurotransmitter glutamate belong to the solute carrier 1 family. They are secondary active transporters, taking up glutamate into the cell against a substantial concentration gradient. The driving force for concentrative uptake is provided by the cotransport of Na+ ions and the countertransport of one K+ in a step independent of the glutamate translocation step. Due to eletrogenicity of transport, the transmembrane potential can also act as a driving force. Glutamate transporters are expressed in many tissues, but are of particular importance in the brain, where they contribute to the termination of excitatory neurotransmission. Glutamate transporters can also run in reverse, resulting in glutamate release from cells. Due to these important physiological functions, glutamate transporter expression and, therefore, the transport rate, are tightly regulated. This review summarizes recent literature on the functional and biophysical properties, structure-function relationships, regulation, physiological significance, and pharmacology of glutamate transporters. Particular emphasis is on the insight from rapid kinetic and electrophysiological studies, transcriptional regulation of transporter expression, and reverse transport and its importance for pathophysiological glutamate release under ischemic conditions.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of HealthUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [2R01NS049335-06A1]; Binational Science Foundation (BSF)US-Israel Binational Science Foundation [2007051]; NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS AND STROKEUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders & Stroke (NINDS) [R01NS049335] Funding Source: NIH RePORTER; This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant 2R01NS049335-06A1 awarded to CG and a Binational Science Foundation (BSF), grant 2007051 awarded to CG and B. I. Kanner.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSPRINGER HEIDELBERG
dc.relation.ispartofPFLUGERS ARCHIV-EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY
dc.subject3' UNTRANSLATED REGION
dc.subjectAMINO-ACID TRANSPORTER
dc.subjectANION CONDUCTANCE
dc.subjectEXTRACELLULAR GATE
dc.subjectFLUORENE-ASPARTIC-ACID
dc.subjectGLIAL GLUTAMATE
dc.subjectGlutamate transporter pharmacology
dc.subjectGlutamate transporters
dc.subjectNeurotransmission
dc.subjectNEUROTRANSMITTER TRANSPORTERS
dc.subjectPhysiology
dc.subjectPOLYMERASE-II TRANSCRIPTION
dc.subjectRAT-BRAIN
dc.subjectRegulation
dc.subjectSLC1
dc.subjectStructure function analysis
dc.subjectTHREO-BETA-BENZYLOXYASPARTATE
dc.titleSLC1 glutamate transporters
dc.typereview
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00424-013-1397-7
dc.identifier.isiISI:000329107000002
dc.description.volume466
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.startpage3
dc.description.endpage24
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-9699-182X
dc.identifier.eissn14322013
dc.publisher.placeTIERGARTENSTRASSE 17, D-69121 HEIDELBERG, GERMANY
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationPflugers Arch.
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Accepted
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