Existential Threat: Uncovering Implicit Affect in Response to Terror Reminders in Soldiers

Autor(en): Quirin, Markus
Malekzad, Farhood
Kazen, Miguel
Luckey, Udo
Kehr, Hugo
Stichwörter: Afghanistan crisis; death awareness; DEFENSE; EXPLICIT; fear of terrorism; implicit affect; IPANAT; MANAGEMENT THEORY; MODEL; MORTALITY SALIENCE; MOTIVATION; Psychology; Psychology, Multidisciplinary
Erscheinungsdatum: 2021
Herausgeber: FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Journal: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Volumen: 12
Zusammenfassung: 
Psychological science has a hard time assessing affective processes of the individuals that they may not recognize or do not like to report on. Here, the authors used the Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT; Quirin et al., 2009) to investigate whether reminders of an existential threat induce unpleasant implicit affect in soldiers waiting for their deployment to a country with high levels of terrorist threat, Afghanistan. As expected, relative to reminding participants of a television evening, implicit negative affect was higher and implicit positive affect was lower after reminding participants of terror acts performed in different cities. No significant effects were found in self-reports of negative or positive affect. Our findings suggest that reminders of existential threat can elicit implicit negative affect that individuals may not report on explicitly and thus, validate the IPANAT as an easily applicable measure in emotional contexts.
ISSN: 16641078
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.585854

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