Payments for environmental services to promote ``climate-smart agriculture''? Potential and challenges

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEngel, Stefanie
dc.contributor.authorMuller, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:13:51Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:13:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn01695150
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/10779-
dc.description.abstractPayments for environmental services (PES) have gained wide popularity as approaches to promote environmentally friendly land use or agricultural production practices. Yet academics have also voiced concerns against seeing PES as a panacea. This article discusses whether PES is an appropriate and promising approach to promote so-called ``climate-smart agriculture'' (CSA) practices, which we define as agricultural production practices that contribute to CO2 emission reductions and/or removals and provide benefits to farmers via increased productivity and profits and reduced vulnerability to climate change. PES appears most promising for the promotion of CSA practices in small-scale farming contexts with low incomes. Effective design, however, requires solid estimates of cost and benefit flows from CSA adoption over time, accounting for differences in socioeconomic and ecological conditions, and addressing the risk of leakage. Funding for such PES will likely have to come from public sources, and seems most promising where synergies with other objectives such as agricultural development, food security, and climate adaptation or other environmental services exist. The potential of alternative approaches for CSA support such as taxation with rebates for CSA practices, CSA-related investment support such as microcredits, and hybrid approaches such as conditional microcredit should be further investigated.
dc.description.sponsorshipAlexander von Humboldt-FoundationAlexander von Humboldt Foundation; Swiss National Science Foundation SNSF through the National Research Programme ``Sustainable Use of Soil as a Resource'' [NRP 68]; The authors thank three anonymous reviewers for helpful feedback on an earlier draft. Funding for this research was provided by the Alexander von Humboldt-Foundation and the Swiss National Science Foundation SNSF through the National Research Programme ``Sustainable Use of Soil as a Resource'' (NRP 68).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofAGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS
dc.subjectAgricultural Economics & Policy
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectBusiness & Economics
dc.subjectclimate change adaptation
dc.subjectclimate change mitigation
dc.subjectclimate smart agriculture
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectCOST-EFFECTIVENESS
dc.subjectDEFORESTATION
dc.subjectDESIGNING PAYMENTS
dc.subjectECONOMIC INCENTIVES
dc.subjectEconomics
dc.subjectMANAGEMENT
dc.subjectpayments for environmental services
dc.subjectPES
dc.subjectPOLICY
dc.subjectPROGRAMS
dc.subjectRICA
dc.titlePayments for environmental services to promote ``climate-smart agriculture''? Potential and challenges
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/agec.12307
dc.identifier.isiISI:000398396200014
dc.description.volume47
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.startpage173
dc.description.endpage184
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-3568-5500
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-7232-9399
dc.identifier.eissn15740862
dc.publisher.place111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationAgric. Econ.
crisitem.author.deptInstitut für Umweltsystemforschung-
crisitem.author.deptidresearchcenter5-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidEnSt966-
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