Pity for economically disadvantaged groups motivates donation and ally collective action intentions

Autor(en): Lantos, Nora Anna
Kende, Anna
Becker, Julia C.
McGarty, Craig
Stichwörter: ACTIVISM; ally collective action; ANGER; ATTITUDES; donation; economic disadvantage; EMOTION; EMPATHY; GUILT; INEQUALITY; pity; Psychology; Psychology, Social; SOCIAL IDENTITY MODEL; SOLIDARITY; VULNERABILITY
Erscheinungsdatum: 2020
Herausgeber: WILEY
Journal: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Volumen: 50
Ausgabe: 7
Startseite: 1478
Seitenende: 1499
Zusammenfassung: 
We argue that pity can motivate collective action intentions toward groups that are both politically and economically deprived. We tested this connection in four online surveys and an experiment. In Study 1 (N = 1,007), pity for the Roma in Hungary predicted collective action intentions, which was replicated in Study 2 in connection with refugees in Germany (N = 191) and in Hungary (N = 563). Study 3 (N = 475) demonstrated that for not economically but politically disadvantaged groups (e.g., sexual minorities), pity was not a predictor of ally action. In an experiment (Study 4,N = 447), pity was just as strong a predictor of collective action intentions as outrage on behalf of an economically and politically disadvantaged outgroup. Pity can be a mobilizing emotion when it comes to groups that are both economically and politically disadvantaged; however, outrage remains more important in the absence of economic hardship.
ISSN: 00462772
DOI: 10.1002/ejsp.2705

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