Co-chaperone Specificity in Gating of the Polypeptide Conducting Channel in the Membrane of the Human Endoplasmic Reticulum

Autor(en): Schorr, Stefan
Klein, Marie-Christine
Gamayun, Igor
Melnyk, Armin
Jung, Martin 
Schaeuble, Nico
Wang, Qian
Hemmis, Birgit
Bochen, Florian
Greiner, Markus
Lampel, Pavel
Urban, Sabine Katharina
Hassdenteufel, Sarah
Dudek, Johanna
Chen, Xing-Zhen
Wagner, Richard 
Cavalie, Adolfo
Zimmermann, Richard
Stichwörter: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; BIP; CA2+ LEAK; CALCIUM LEAK; DIABETES-MELLITUS; DNAJ HOMOLOG; INTRACELLULAR CA2+; SEC61 TRANSLOCON; SECRETORY PROTEINS; STRESS; UNFOLDED PROTEIN RESPONSE
Erscheinungsdatum: 2015
Herausgeber: AMER SOC BIOCHEMISTRY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INC
Journal: JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY
Volumen: 290
Ausgabe: 30
Startseite: 18621
Seitenende: 18635
Zusammenfassung: 
In mammalian cells, signal peptide-dependent protein transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by a dynamic polypeptide-conducting channel, the heterotrimeric Sec61 complex. Previous work has characterized the Sec61 complex as a potential ER Ca2+ leak channel in HeLa cells and identified ER lumenal molecular chaper one immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein (BiP) as limiting Ca2+ leakage via the open Sec61 channel by facilitating channel closing. This BiP activity involves binding of BiP to the ER lumenal loop 7 of Sec61 alpha in the vicinity of tyrosine 344. Of note, the Y344H mutation destroys the BiP binding site and causes pancreatic alpha-cell apoptosis and diabetes in mice. Here, we systematically depleted HeLa cells of the BiP co-chaperones by siRNA-mediated gene silencing and used live cell Ca2+ imaging to monitor the effects on ER Ca2+ leakage. Depletion of either one of the ER lumenal BiP co-chaperones, ERj3 and ERj6, but not the ER membrane-resident co-chaperones (such as Sec63 protein, which assists BiP in Sec61 channel opening) led to increased Ca2+ leakage via Sec6 complex, thereby phenocopying the effect of BiP depletion. Thus, BiP facilitates Sec61 channel closure (i.e. limits ER Ca2+ leakage) via the Sec61 channel with the help of ERj3 and ERj6. Interestingly, deletion of ERj6 causes pancreatic beta-cell failure and diabetes in mice and humans. We suggest that co-chaperone-controlled gating of the Sec61 channel by BiP is particularly important for cells, which are highly active in protein secretion, and that breakdown of this regulatory mechanism can cause apoptosis and disease.
DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M115.636639

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