Subjective reports of stimulus, response, and decision times in speeded tasks: How accurate are decision time reports?

Autor(en): Miller, Jeff
Vieweg, Paula
Kruize, Nicolas
McLea, Belinda
Stichwörter: COMPATIBILITY; Conscious awareness; CONSCIOUS INTENTION; Decision times; EXPERIENCE; JUDGMENTS; Libet paradigm; MOMENTUM; MOTOR PROCESSES; MOVEMENTS; NEUROSCIENCE; ONSET; Psychology; Psychology, Experimental; Report accuracy; VOLUNTARY
Erscheinungsdatum: 2010
Herausgeber: ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE
Journal: CONSCIOUSNESS AND COGNITION
Volumen: 19
Ausgabe: 4
Startseite: 1013
Seitenende: 1036
Zusammenfassung: 
Four experiments examined how accurately participants can report the times of their own decisions. Within an auditory reaction time (RI) task, participants reported the time at which (a) the tone was presented, (b) they decided on the response, or (c) the response key was pressed. Decision time reports were checked for plausibility against the actual RTs, and we compared the effects of experimental manipulations on these two measures to see whether the reported decision times showed appropriate effects. In addition, we estimated the amount of error associated with individual decision time reports by checking how often participants' decision time reports were implausibly early (i.e., before stimulus onset) or late (i.e., after response), and by using several quantitative models. Overall, the results suggest that decision time reports are not very accurate but they may be usable for some purposes. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
ISSN: 10538100
DOI: 10.1016/j.concog.2010.06.001

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