Why Religion's Burdens Are Light: From Religiosity to Implicit Self-Regulation

Autor(en): Koole, Sander L.
McCullough, Michael E.
Kuhl, Julius 
Roelofsma, Peter H. M. P.
Stichwörter: ACTION ORIENTATION; automatic process; DEATH; ESTEEM; FUNDAMENTALISM; GOALS; GOD; implicit process; MEDITATION; MORTALITY SALIENCE; Psychology; Psychology, Social; religion; self-regulation; SOCIAL-PERCEPTION; TERROR MANAGEMENT
Erscheinungsdatum: 2010
Herausgeber: SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
Journal: PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW
Volumen: 14
Ausgabe: 1
Startseite: 95
Seitenende: 107
Zusammenfassung: 
To maintain religious standards, individuals must frequently endure aversive or forsake pleasurable experiences. Yet religious individuals on average display higher levels of emotional well-being compared to nonreligious individuals. The present article seeks to resolve this paradox by suggesting that many forms of religion may facilitate a self-regulatory mode that is flexible, efficient, and largely unconscious. In this implicit mode of self-regulation, religious individuals may be able to strive for high standards and simultaneously maintain high emotional well-being. A review of the empirical literature confirmed that religious stimuli and practices foster implicit self-regulation, particularly among individuals who fully internalized their religion's standards. The present work suggests that some seemingly irrational aspects of religion may have important psychological benefits by promoting implicit self-regulation.
ISSN: 10888683
DOI: 10.1177/1088868309351109

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