Stress-induced proteins of Agrobacterium tumefaciens

Autor(en): Rosen, R
Buttner, K
Schmid, R
Hecker, M
Ron, EZ
Stichwörter: Agrobacterium; BACILLUS-SUBTILIS; BRADYRHIZOBIUM-JAPONICUM; environmental stress response; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; GLOBAL ANALYSIS; GROESL OPERON; heat shock; HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS; MESSENGER-RNA; Microbiology; OXIDATIVE STRESS; RESPONSES; SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM
Erscheinungsdatum: 2001
Herausgeber: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Journal: FEMS MICROBIOLOGY ECOLOGY
Volumen: 35
Ausgabe: 3
Startseite: 277
Seitenende: 285
Zusammenfassung: 
The pattern of proteins produced by bacteria represents the physiological state of the organism as well as the environmental conditions encountered. Environmental stress induces the expression of several regulons encoding stress proteins. Extensive information about the proteins which constitute these regulons (or stimulons) and their control is available for very few bacteria, such as the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli (gamma -proteobacteria) and is minimal for all other bacteria. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a Gram-negative plant pathogen of the alpha -proteobacteria, which constitutes the main tool for plant recombinant genetics. Our previous studies on the control of chaperone-coding operons indicated that A. tumefaciens has unique features and combines regulatory elements from both B. subtilis and E. coli. Therefore, we examined the patterns of proteins induced in A. tumefaciens by environmental changes using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and dual-channel image analysis. Shifts to high temperature, oxidative and mild acid stresses stimulated the expression of 97 proteins. The results indicate that most of these stress-induced proteins (80/97) were specific to one stress stimulon. Only 10 proteins appear to belong tc, a general stress regulon. (C) 2001 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
ISSN: 01686496
DOI: 10.1016/S0168-6496(01)00101-5

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