The Impact of Including Advantaged Groups in Collective Action Against Social Inequality on Politicized Identification of Observers From Disadvantaged and Advantaged Groups

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKutlaca, Maja
dc.contributor.authorRadke, Helena R. M.
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Julia C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:16:29Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:16:29Z-
dc.identifier.issn0162895X
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/11895-
dc.description.abstractMobilizing public support is key to a movement's success. Little is known, however, about how movements can achieve this goal and whether involving advantaged group members is beneficial for a movement's cause. In a set of five experiments with convenience samples collected in the United States and Germany (total N = 1,625), we examined whether protests (e.g., against racism and sexism) with and without advantaged group members affect politicized identification among observers. We expected that the presence (vs. absence) of advantaged group members at a protest will increase politicized identification among advantaged group observers, which was confirmed in Studies 1A-1C. In contrast, we expected that the disadvantaged group observers will increase or decrease their politicized identification depending on the role advantaged group members have at a protest (i.e., supportive vs. leadership role). Studies 2A-2B revealed that when advantaged group members had a supportive role, disadvantaged and advantaged group observers increased their politicized identification, but this effect was absent when they had a leadership role. Moreover, including advantaged group members in a protest increased the belief that solidarity is a normative behavior and the expectations that a protest will be peaceful among observers. Implications for research on allyship are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipProjekt DEAL; Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Maja Kutlaca, Department of Psychology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, UK. E-mail:maja.kutlaca@durham.ac.uk Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofPOLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY
dc.subjectadvantaged group
dc.subjectallyship
dc.subjectATTITUDES
dc.subjectdisadvantaged group
dc.subjectGovernment & Law
dc.subjectGROUP MEMBERS
dc.subjectGROUP NORMS
dc.subjectHELP
dc.subjectIDENTITY MODEL
dc.subjectobservers
dc.subjectPolitical Science
dc.subjectpoliticized identification
dc.subjectPREJUDICE
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Social
dc.subjectSOLIDARITY
dc.titleThe Impact of Including Advantaged Groups in Collective Action Against Social Inequality on Politicized Identification of Observers From Disadvantaged and Advantaged Groups
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/pops.12755
dc.identifier.isiISI:000661184000001
dc.identifier.eissn14679221
dc.publisher.place111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationPolit. Psychol.
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Accepted, Green Published, hybrid
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