Body Image in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Childhood Sexual Abuse and Co-Occurring Eating Disorder

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDyer, Anne
dc.contributor.authorBorgmann, Elisabeth
dc.contributor.authorKleindienst, Nikolaus
dc.contributor.authorFeldmann, Jr., Robert E.
dc.contributor.authorVocks, Silja
dc.contributor.authorBohus, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:18:06Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:18:06Z-
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn02544962
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/12539-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Body image is a multidimensional construct with cognitive-affective, behavioral and perceptive components. Survivors of childhood sexual abuse report a disturbance of the cognitive-affective component of their body image but not of the perceptive component. It has not yet been examined whether and how the behavioral component is affected. Also, it is still unknown whether the disturbances might be due to the influence of co-occurring eating disorders. Sampling and Methods: The cognitive-affective and behavioral components of the body image of 84 female participants with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after childhood sexual abuse (31 with a co-occurring eating disorder) and 53 healthy participants were assessed via the Dresden Body Image Inventory (Dresdner Korperbildfragebogen-35, DKB-35) and the Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire (BIAQ). Results: PTSD patients reported significantly higher negative scores on all DKB-35 subscales (p < 0.001) and the BIAQ (p = 0.002; p < 0.001). Results remained consistent after accounting for the influence of co-occurring eating disorders (p = 0.021; p = 0.001; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Results show for the first time that the behavioral component of the body image is impaired in female patients with PTSD in addition to the cognitive-affective component. This is not solely due to a comorbid eating disorder. The effect of established treatments on the body image of PTSD patients should be evaluated and new treatment modules should be developed and tested, if necessary. Copyright (C) 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherKARGER
dc.relation.ispartofPSYCHOPATHOLOGY
dc.subjectANOREXIA-NERVOSA
dc.subjectBody image
dc.subjectBULIMIA-NERVOSA
dc.subjectChildhood sexual abuse
dc.subjectEating disorder
dc.subjectGERMAN VERSION
dc.subjectPosttraumatic stress disorder
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectQUESTIONNAIRE
dc.subjectVALIDITY
dc.titleBody Image in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder after Childhood Sexual Abuse and Co-Occurring Eating Disorder
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000341590
dc.identifier.isiISI:000317809600008
dc.description.volume46
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.startpage186
dc.description.endpage191
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-8498-9466
dc.contributor.researcheridT-8764-2018
dc.identifier.eissn1423033X
dc.publisher.placeALLSCHWILERSTRASSE 10, CH-4009 BASEL, SWITZERLAND
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationPsychopathology
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0001-8498-9466-
crisitem.author.netidVoSi856-
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