Integrating basic and higher-cognitive emotions within a common evolutionary framework: Lessons from the transformation of primate dominance into human pride

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorClark, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T15:56:21Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T15:56:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn09515089
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/2304-
dc.description.abstractMany argue that higher-cognitive emotions such as pride arose de novo in humans, and thus fall outside of the scope of the kinds of evolutionary explanations offered for basic emotions, like fear. This approach fractures the general category of emotion into two deeply distinct kinds of emotion. However, an increasing number of emotion researchers are converging on the conclusion that higher-cognitive emotions are evolutionarily rooted in simpler emotional responses found in primates. I argue that pride fits this pattern, and then consider some of the possible mechanisms by which the basic forms of these emotions have been transformed, arguing that we can see this transformation in part as the progressive internalization of originally externalized processes associated with norms, selfhood, and social structure. This connects the emotion literature with the literatures on the Social/Machiavellian Intelligence Hypothesis and situated cognition, offering the possibility of a more unified theory of human emotions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
dc.relation.ispartofPHILOSOPHICAL PSYCHOLOGY
dc.subjectBasic Emotions
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectEthics
dc.subjectEvolution
dc.subjectEXPRESSION
dc.subjectHIERARCHY
dc.subjectHigher-Cognitive Emotions
dc.subjectHOMOLOGY
dc.subjectMachiavellian Intelligence
dc.subjectPride
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Multidisciplinary
dc.subjectSELF
dc.subjectSerial Homology
dc.subjectSHAME
dc.subjectSituated Cognition
dc.subjectSocial Sciences - Other Topics
dc.titleIntegrating basic and higher-cognitive emotions within a common evolutionary framework: Lessons from the transformation of primate dominance into human pride
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09515089.2012.659168
dc.identifier.isiISI:000321812000007
dc.description.volume26
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.startpage437
dc.description.endpage460
dc.identifier.eissn1465394X
dc.publisher.place2-4 PARK SQUARE, MILTON PARK, ABINGDON OX14 4RN, OXON, ENGLAND
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationPhilos. Psychol.
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