Does the specifity of theory of mind and inhibitory control persist over the life-span? The relation of mentalistic and self-regulatory competence in adult age

Autor(en): Chasiotis, A
Kiessling, F
Stichwörter: adult age; DEFICITS; EXECUTIVE FUNCTION; INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES; inhibitory control; LANGUAGE; Psychology; Psychology, Educational; self-regulation; SIBLINGS; theory of mind
Erscheinungsdatum: 2004
Herausgeber: HOGREFE & HUBER PUBLISHERS
Journal: ZEITSCHRIFT FUR ENTWICKLUNGSPSYCHOLOGIE UND PADAGOGISCHE PSYCHOLOGIE
Volumen: 36
Ausgabe: 2
Startseite: 105
Seitenende: 114
Zusammenfassung: 
A number of recent studies on the developmental relation between theory of mind (TOM) and inhibitory skills point to a close relationship between both constructs. This relation remains significant even after controlling for verbal intelligence, birth rank, and socio-economic status. In two exploratory studies we examined if this relation also exists in adult age. In order to survey TOM in adulthood, stories requiring mentalistic understanding of complex social situations were used. As a measure for inhibitory skills in adult age, a modified version of the Self-Regulation Test for Children (SRKT-K, Kuhl & Kraska, 1992) was used. While variables influencing development in childhood did not reveal any consistent effects, the relation between TOM competence and inhibitory skills remained significant in adult age and could be found in both samples. The specifity of this relation is shown in the replicated result that self-regulatory skills significantly correlate with theory of mind competence, but only marginally with task difficulty or other higher cognitive functions like memory and verbal intelligence.
ISSN: 00498637
DOI: 10.1026/0049-8637.36.2.105

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