PTS 50: Past, Present and Future, or Diauxie Revisited

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLengeler, Joseph W.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T15:58:39Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T15:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn14641801
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/3495-
dc.description.abstractPast: The title `PTS 50 or The PTS after 50 years' relies on the first description in 1964 of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent carbohydrate: phosphotransferase system (PTS) by Kundig, Gosh and Roseman [Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1964; 52: 1067-1074]. The system comprised proteins named Enzyme I, HPr and Enzymes II, as part of a novel PTS for carbohydrates in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, whose `biological significance remained unclear'. In contrast, studies which would eventually lead to the discovery of the central role of the PTS in bacterial metabolism had been published since before 1942. They are primarily linked to names like Epps and Gale, J. Monod, Cohn and Horibata, and B. Magasanik, and to phenomena like `glucose effects', `diauxie', `catabolite repression' and carbohydrate transport. Present: The pioneering work from Roseman's group initiated a flood of publications. The extraordinary progress from 1964 to this day in the qualitative and in vitro description of the genes and enzymes of the PTS, and of its multiple roles in global cellular control through `inducer exclusion', gene induction and `catabolite repression', in cellular growth, in cell differentiation and in chemotaxis, as well as the differences of its functions between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, was one theme of the meeting and will not be treated in detail here. Future: At the 1988 Paris meeting entitled `The PTS after 25 years', Saul Roseman predicted that `we must describe these interactions [of the PTS components] in a quantitative way [under] in vivo conditions'. I will present some results obtained by our group during recent years on the old phenomenon of diauxie by means of very fast and quantitative tests, measured in vivo, and obtained from cultures of isogenic mutant strains growing under chemostat conditions. The results begin to hint at the problems relating to future PTS research, but also to the `true science' of Roseman. (C) 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherKARGER
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
dc.subjectBACTERIAL PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE SYSTEM
dc.subjectBETA-GALACTOSIDASE
dc.subjectBiotechnology & Applied Microbiology
dc.subjectCARBOHYDRATE TRANSPORT
dc.subjectCATABOLITE REPRESSION
dc.subjectDiauxie
dc.subjectESCHERICHIA-COLI K-12
dc.subjectGALACTOSIDE-ENZYME SYSTEM
dc.subjectGlobal regulatory systems
dc.subjectGLUCOSE
dc.subjectInducer exclusion
dc.subjectMETABOLIC PATHWAY
dc.subjectMicrobiology
dc.subjectPHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE
dc.subjectPhosphotransferase systems
dc.subjectProkaryotes
dc.subjectSensory systems
dc.subjectSTAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS
dc.titlePTS 50: Past, Present and Future, or Diauxie Revisited
dc.typereview
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000369809
dc.identifier.isiISI:000357834900002
dc.description.volume25
dc.description.issue2-3
dc.description.startpage79
dc.description.endpage93
dc.identifier.eissn16602412
dc.publisher.placeALLSCHWILERSTRASSE 10, CH-4009 BASEL, SWITZERLAND
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationJ. Mol. Microbiol. Biotechnol.
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