Acne and diet

Autor(en): Melnik, B. C.
Stichwörter: ANDROGEN-RECEPTOR GENE; BODY-MASS INDEX; Dermatology; Glycemic load; GLYCEMIC-LOAD DIET; GROWTH-FACTOR-I; INSULIN-RESISTANCE; MAMMALIAN TARGET; Milk; MILK CONSUMPTION; mTORC1; Nutrition; PROSTATE-CANCER RISK; Sebaceous follicle; SERUM-INSULIN; WHEY-PROTEIN
Erscheinungsdatum: 2013
Herausgeber: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Journal: HAUTARZT
Volumen: 64
Ausgabe: 4
Startseite: 252+
Zusammenfassung: 
In industrialized countries acne presents as an epidemic disease of civilization affecting sebaceous follicles of adolescents and young adults, associated with increased body mass index and insulin resistance. ``Western style'' diet, characterized by high glycaemic load and increased consumption of insulinotropic milk proteins, plays an important role in acne pathogenesis. On the cellular level, nutrient-derived metabolic signals are sensed by the metabolic transcription factor FoxO1 and integrated by the regulatory kinase mTORC1. mTORC1, the central hub of protein- and lipid biosynthesis, cell growth and proliferation, is activated by insulin, IGF-1 and branched-chain essential amino acids, especially leucine. The understanding of Western diet-mediated nutrient signalling with over-activated mTORC1 offers a reasonable approach for dietary intervention in acne by lowering glycaemic load and consumption of milk and milk products. A suitable diet attenuating increased mTORC1 activity is a Palaeolithic-like diet with reduced intake of sugar, hyperglycaemic grains, milk and milk products but enriched consumption of vegetables and fish.
ISSN: 00178470
DOI: 10.1007/s00105-012-2461-5

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