Do DSM-5 eating disorder criteria overpathologize normative eating patterns among individuals with obesity?

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Jennifer Joanne
dc.contributor.authorKoh, Katherine A.
dc.contributor.authorEddy, Kamryn T.
dc.contributor.authorHartmann, Andrea S.
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Helen B.
dc.contributor.authorGorman, Mark J.
dc.contributor.authorSogg, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Anne E.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-06T11:05:57Z-
dc.date.available2022-04-06T11:05:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.issn2090-0708
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/44551-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND DSM-5 revisions have been criticized in the popular press for overpathologizing normative eating patterns-particularly among individuals with obesity. To evaluate the evidence for this and other DSM-5 critiques, we compared the point prevalence and interrater reliability of DSM-IV versus DSM-5 eating disorders (EDs) among adults seeking weight-loss treatment. METHOD Clinicians (n = 2) assigned DSM-IV and DSM-5 ED diagnoses to 100 participants via routine clinical interview. Research assessors (n = 3) independently conferred ED diagnoses via Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and a DSM-5 checklist. RESULTS Research assessors diagnosed a similar proportion of participants with EDs under DSM-IV (29%) versus DSM-5 (32%). DSM-5 research diagnoses included binge eating disorder (9%), bulimia nervosa (2%), subthreshold binge eating disorder (5%), subthreshold bulimia nervosa (2%), purging disorder (1%), night eating syndrome (6%), and other (7%). Interrater reliability between clinicians and research assessors was "substantial" for both DSM-IV (κ = 0.64, 84% agreement) and DSM-5 (κ = 0.63, 83% agreement). CONCLUSION DSM-5 ED criteria can be reliably applied in an obesity treatment setting and appear to yield an overall ED point prevalence comparable to DSM-IV.
dc.language.isoen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Obesity
dc.sourcePubMed
dc.subjectDiagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
dc.subjectReproducibility of Results
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectBulimia/complications/diagnosis
dc.subjectFeeding and Eating Disorders/complications/diagnosis
dc.subjectFeeding Behavior
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectReference Values
dc.subjectBinge-Eating Disorder/complications/diagnosis
dc.subjectBulimia Nervosa/complications/diagnosis
dc.subjectObesity/complications
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectInterviews as Topic
dc.subjectInterview, Psychological
dc.subjectObserver Variation
dc.titleDo DSM-5 eating disorder criteria overpathologize normative eating patterns among individuals with obesity?
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1155/2014/320803
dc.identifier.pmid25057413
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4098982
dc.contributor.affiliationEating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Institute for Psychology, University of Osnabrück, 49074 Osnabrück, Germany. Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationMassachusetts General Hospital Weight Center, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationMassachusetts General Hospital Weight Center, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Eating Disorders Clinical and Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA
dc.contributor.affiliationDepartment of Global Health & Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
dc.description.volume2014
dc.description.issue320803
local.import.remainsU3 : Evaluation Study Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
local.import.sourcefile./Hartmann_Andrea S_sk_Citavi_20220107.ris
crisitem.author.deptFB 08 - Humanwissenschaften-
crisitem.author.deptidfb08-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidHaAn413-
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