Holes bound as small polarons to acceptor defects in oxide materials: why are their thermal ionization energies so high?

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchirmer, O. F.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:01:53Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn09538984
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/5227-
dc.description.abstractHoles bound to acceptor defects in oxide materials usually need comparatively high energies, of the order of 0.5-1.0 eV, to be ionized thermally to the valence band maximum. It is discussed that this has to be attributed to the stabilization of such holes by mainly short range interactions with the surrounding lattice, leading to the formation of small O- polarons. This is tantamount to the localization of the hole at only one of several equivalent oxygen ions next to the defect. The hole stabilizing energies can be determined experimentally from the related intense optical absorption bands. This paper exploits previous phenomenological studies of bound-hole small polarons in order to account for the large hole stabilization energies on this basis. A compilation demonstrates that bound-hole small polarons occur rather often in oxides and also in some related materials. The identification of such systems is based on EPR and optical studies and also on recent advanced electronic structure calculations.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTD
dc.relation.ispartofJOURNAL OF PHYSICS-CONDENSED MATTER
dc.subjectCATION VACANCIES
dc.subjectCONDUCTIVITY
dc.subjectGERMANIUM
dc.subjectLITHIUM
dc.subjectMAGNETIC-RESONANCE
dc.subjectMGO
dc.subjectOPTICAL-ABSORPTION
dc.subjectPhysics
dc.subjectPhysics, Condensed Matter
dc.titleHoles bound as small polarons to acceptor defects in oxide materials: why are their thermal ionization energies so high?
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/0953-8984/23/33/334218
dc.identifier.isiISI:000294060600020
dc.description.volume23
dc.description.issue33
dc.identifier.eissn1361648X
dc.publisher.placeTEMPLE CIRCUS, TEMPLE WAY, BRISTOL BS1 6BE, ENGLAND
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationJ. Phys.-Condes. Matter
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