LIGHT-SCATTERING-STUDIES OF COPOLYMERS .1. SOLUBLE HEMOGLOBIN DEXTRAN COMPLEXES

Autor(en): NORDMEIER, E
RAD, D
Stichwörter: COPOLYMERS; LIGHT SCATTERING; Polymer Science; SOLUBLE HEMOGLOBIN DEXTRAN COMPLEXES
Erscheinungsdatum: 1994
Herausgeber: JOHN WILEY & SONS INC
Journal: JOURNAL OF POLYMER SCIENCE PART B-POLYMER PHYSICS
Volumen: 32
Ausgabe: 1
Startseite: 63
Seitenende: 76
Zusammenfassung: 
Complexes between dextrans of different molar mass and bovine hemoglobin were synthesized by two different methods. In the alkylation method three and in the dialdehyde method, two hemoglobins are coupled on average to one dextran molecule. In both cases, the soluble hemoglobin-dextran complexes reversibly bind and release oxygen; the oxygen affinity is greater than that of free hemoglobin. Static and dynamic light scattering was used to determine the average molar mass M(w), the radius of gyration [S2]z1/2, and the hydrodynamic radius Rh of both the complexes and the single dextrans. Interpretation of these data is complicated due to the fact that the complexes are copolymers. When appropriate approximations are made, the results indicate that the complexes have a spherical shape and an internal structure of a multiple-chain network, where several dextrans are linked together by the hemoglobins. The number of single dextrans per complex increases as the molar mass of the single dextrans is decreased. The increment is greater in the dialdehyde than in the alkylation method. The probable reason is that in the dialdehyde method one hemoglobin can connect many dextrans simultaneously while in the alkylation method a hemoglobin is able to link maximally two dextrans. The ratio of the radius of gyration to the hydrodynamic radius decreases as the temperature is increased. This suggests a decrease of the solvent penetration length for the complexes and can be interpreted on the basis of the Deutsch-Felderhof theory for porous spheres. (C) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN: 08876266
DOI: 10.1002/polb.1994.090320109

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