TOWARD AN UNDERSTANDING OF LEGAL CULTURE - VARIATIONS IN INDIVIDUALISM AND COLLECTIVISM BETWEEN KURDS LEBANESE, GERMANS

Autor(en): BIERBRAUER, G
Stichwörter: Government & Law; Law; SELF; Sociology
Erscheinungsdatum: 1994
Herausgeber: WILEY
Journal: LAW & SOCIETY REVIEW
Volumen: 28
Ausgabe: 2
Startseite: 243
Seitenende: 264
Zusammenfassung: 
Legal culture is a socially derived product encompassing such interrelated concepts as legitimacy and acceptance of authorities, preferences for and beliefs about dispute arrangements, and authorities' use of discretionary power. This study investigated five attributes of legal culture by comparing subjective notions of law and the legal system of respondents from Turkey (Kurds), Lebanon, and Germany. Our samples fell into two distinct groups on cultural orientation: the German group showed a distinct individualistic orientation; the two other groups (Kurds and Lebanese) showed a relative collectivistic orientation. The findings suggest a substantial variety of legal preferences and practices between the two orientations. Collectivistic groups had a greater preference for abiding by the norms of tradition and religion and were less willing to let state law regulate in-group disputes; individualistic respondents showed a clear preference for formal procedures and guidelines. The study suggests that legal norms prevailing in Western societies may be inconsequential to people socialized in other cultures. Implications of diverse conceptions of law, legal expectations, and legitimacy for various cultural groups in multiethnic and plural societies are discussed.
ISSN: 00239216
DOI: 10.2307/3054146

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