Self-labelling enzymes as universal tags for fluorescence microscopy, super-resolution microscopy and electron microscopy

Autor(en): Liss, Viktoria
Barlag, Britta
Nietschke, Monika
Hensel, Michael 
Stichwörter: CORRELATED LIGHT; DIAMINOBENZIDINE; FUSION PROTEINS; HORSERADISH-PEROXIDASE; IDENTIFICATION; LIVING CELLS; MARKERS; Multidisciplinary Sciences; PHOTOCONVERSION; PHOTOOXIDATION; REPORTER GENE; Science & Technology - Other Topics
Erscheinungsdatum: 2015
Herausgeber: NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Journal: SCIENTIFIC REPORTS
Volumen: 5
Zusammenfassung: 
Research in cell biology demands advanced microscopy techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy (FM), super-resolution microscopy (SRM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) is an approach to combine data on the dynamics of proteins or protein complexes in living cells with the ultrastructural details in the low nanometre scale. To correlate both data sets, markers functional in FM, SRM and TEM are required. Genetically encoded markers such as fluorescent proteins or self-labelling enzyme tags allow observations in living cells. Various genetically encoded tags are available for FM and SRM, but only few tags are suitable for CLEM. Here, we describe the red fluorescent dye tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) as a multimodal marker for CLEM. TMR is used as fluorochrome coupled to ligands of genetically encoded self-labelling enzyme tags HaloTag, SNAP-tag and CLIP-tag in FM and SRM. We demonstrate that TMR can additionally photooxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) to an osmiophilic polymer visible on TEM sections, thus being a marker suitable for FM, SRM and TEM. We evaluated various organelle markers with enzymatic tags in mammalian cells labelled with TMR-coupled ligands and demonstrate the use as efficient and versatile DAB photooxidizer for CLEM approaches.
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/srep17740

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