Cultural perspectives on children's tadpole drawings: at the interface between representation and production

Autor(en): Gernhardt, Ariane
Ruebeling, Hartmut
Keller, Heidi
Stichwörter: AGE; artwork; body-proportion-effect; CONCEPTIONS; cultural influence; drawing development; EMOTION; FAMILY DRAWINGS; preschool age; Psychology; Psychology, Multidisciplinary; SELF; self-drawings; SIZE; SOCIALIZATION GOALS; tadpole drawings
Erscheinungsdatum: 2015
Herausgeber: FRONTIERS MEDIA SA
Journal: FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY
Volumen: 6
Zusammenfassung: 
This study investigated tadpole self-drawings from 183 three- to six-year-old children living in seven cultural groups, representing three ecosocial contexts. Based on assumed general production principles, the influence of cultural norms and values upon specific characteristics of the tadpole drawings was examined. The results demonstrated that children from all cultural groups realized the body-proportion effect in the self-drawings, indicating universal production principles. However, children differed in single drawing characteristics, depending on the specific ecosocial context. Children from Western and non-Western urban educated contexts drew themselves rather tall, with many facial features, and preferred smiling facial expressions, while children from rural traditional contexts depicted themselves significantly smaller, with less facial details, and neutral facial expressions.
ISSN: 16641078
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00812

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