Temporary Labour Migration and State-Run Recruitment of Foreign Workers in Europe, 1919-1975: A New Migration Regime?

Autor(en): Rass, Christoph 
Stichwörter: EMIGRATION; History; ORGANIZATIONS; WORLD
Erscheinungsdatum: 2012
Herausgeber: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS
Journal: INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF SOCIAL HISTORY
Volumen: 57
Ausgabe: 20
Startseite: 191
Seitenende: 224
Zusammenfassung: 
Temporary labour migration was one of the characteristic phenomena of human mobility in Europe during the twentieth century. The predominant answer in several European countries to the growing economic demand for an external labour supply on the one hand, and political demands to limit the numbers of foreign workers and to protect the native workforce from the competition of ``cheap'' migrant labour on the other, was a growing direct and active involvement of the nation state in regulatory efforts and recruitment operations abroad. Besides bureaucratic organizations on a national level, bilateral recruitment agreements - starting in their modern form in 1919 - became the most important tool to regulate labour migration between two countries. This article takes a look at the evolving system of bilaterally fixed migration relations in Europe and its implications for sending and receiving countries as well as for the labour migrants involved. It argues that the network of bilateral recruitment agreements provided controlled and selective migration channels in Europe between the 1950s and 1970s. These agreements installed and protected certain minimum standards to migrants and led to a general improvement of the rights and conditions offered to temporary labour migrants in Europe.
ISSN: 00208590
DOI: 10.1017/S0020859012000466

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