Striving for unwanted goals: Stress-dependent discrepancies between explicit and implicit achievement motives reduce subjective well-being and increase psychosomatic symptoms

Autor(en): Baumann, N
Kaschel, R
Kuhl, J 
Stichwörter: achievement orientation; ACTION ORIENTATION; ACTIVATION; COHERENCE; implicit motives; LIFE; MEMORY; PERSONAL GOALS; PSI theory; Psychology; Psychology, Social; psychosomatic symptoms; READJUSTMENT RATING-SCALE; SELF-INFILTRATION; self-regulation; STATE ORIENTATION; VALIDITY
Erscheinungsdatum: 2005
Herausgeber: AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC
Journal: JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
Volumen: 89
Ausgabe: 5
Startseite: 781
Seitenende: 799
Zusammenfassung: 
Three studies investigated the relevance of affect regulation, stressful life events, and congruence between explicit achievement orientation and implicit achievement motive for subjective well-being and symptom formation. According to personality systems interactions (PSI) theory, stressful life events were expected to reduce motive congruence when the ability to self-regulate affect was impaired (i.e., state orientation). Consistent with expectations, the State Orientation X Stress interaction predicted incongruence in healthy participants (Studies I and 3) and in patients (Study 2). Furthermore, incongruence partially mediated the direct State Orientation X Stress effect on subjective well-being (Studies I and 3) and the course of psychosomatic complaints over 3 months (Study 2). In Study 3, the experimental induction of threat reduced motive congruence in state-oriented participants compared with an acceptance condition. Findings underscore the importance of assessing motive congruence as a ``hidden stressor'' and validate a new operant multimotive test.
ISSN: 00223514
DOI: 10.1037/0022-3514.89.5.781

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