The Measurement Quality of the Beck Depression-Inventory (BDI-II) in Different Clinical Samples: An Item Response Theory Analysis

Autor(en): Keller, Ferdinand
Kuehner, Christine
Alexandrowicz, Rainer W.
Voderholzer, Ulrich
Meule, Adrian
Fegert, Joerg M.
Legenbauer, Tanja
Holtmann, Martin
Braescher, Anne-Kathrin
Cordes, Martin
Fehm, Lydia
Fladung, Anne-Katharina
Fydrich, Thomas
Hamm, Alfons
Heider, Jens
Hoyer, Juergen
In-Albon, Tina
Lincoln, Tania M.
Lutz, Wolfgang
Margraf, Juergen
Renneberg, Babette
Schlarb, Angelika
Schoettke, Henning
Teismann, Tobias
Velten, Julia
Willutzki, Ulrike
Witthoeft, Michael
Ziem, Max
Hautzinger, Martin
Stichwörter: Beck Depression-Inventory II; CORE SYMPTOMS; depression; INVARIANCE; item response theory (IRT); LATENT ABILITY; measurement precision; MODEL; Psychology; Psychology, Clinical; RELIABILITY; TEST INFORMATION; VALIDITY
Erscheinungsdatum: 2022
Herausgeber: HOGREFE VERLAG
Enthalten in: ZEITSCHRIFT FUR KLINISCHE PSYCHOLOGIE UND PSYCHOTHERAPIE
Zusammenfassung: 
Background: The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) is a self-report instrument for assessing the severity of depression. To date, publications on psychometric properties based on item response theory (IRT) are largely missing. Objective: To determine how high the measurement precision is across the latent trait and whether the item categories are in ascending order. Methods: Using six large data sets from different clinical settings, we performed psychometric analyses using the graded response model. Results: We identified high internal consistencies in all samples. Apart from item 6 (''penalty feelings''), all categories were ordered. According to the Test Information Function, the BDI-II shows very good measurement precision (reliability > .90) in the moderate to high depression range, and good precision in the lower range. Conclusions: Our data revealed high and relatively stable measurement precision across a broad range of the depression construct. We consider the BDI-II to be welt suited for assessing depression severity levels, particularly in clinical but also in nonclinical settings.
ISSN: 1616-3443
DOI: 10.1026/1616-3443/a000676

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