Grandmaternal and maternal ethnotheories about early child care

Autor(en): Lamm, Bettina
Keller, Heidi
Yovsi, Relindis D.
Chaudhary, Nandita
Stichwörter: AMERICAN; AUTONOMY; CHINESE; CONGRUENCE; CULTURAL MODELS; ethnotheories; Family Studies; grandmother; PARENTAL ETHNOTHEORIES; parenting; Psychology; Psychology, Clinical; RELATEDNESS; SELF-DESCRIPTION; SOCIALIZATION; VALUES
Erscheinungsdatum: 2008
Herausgeber: AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC
Journal: JOURNAL OF FAMILY PSYCHOLOGY
Volumen: 22
Ausgabe: 1
Startseite: 80
Seitenende: 88
Zusammenfassung: 
Parenting ethnotheories represent an organized set of ideas about parents, children, and development that are shared by members of cultural groups. Because these ideas and beliefs reflect cultural models and serve as representational frameworks for parenting strategies, they need to change with historical time. To analyze these changes, the authors interviewed mothers and grandmothers of 3-month-old infants in 4 different cultural environments-urban German middle-class families (41 mothers, 22 grandmothers), urban Indian middle-class families (36 mothers, 12 grandmothers), rural Cameroonian Nso families (29 mothers, 20 grandmothers), and urban Cameroonian Nso families (28 mothers, 12 grandmothers)-in regard to their ideas about infant care. The inter-views were analyzed according to content and discourse style. The results reveal that there is not only transmission of parental beliefs from one generation to the next but also variation in adaptation to changing environments. Although the global trend toward more independent cultural models of parenting is confirmed, the magnitude of change varies across the different cultural environments.
ISSN: 08933200
DOI: 10.1037/0893-3200.22.1.80

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