Genetic variation in Goniolimon speciosum (Plumbaginaceae) reveals a complex history of steppe vegetation

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVolkova, Polina A.
dc.contributor.authorHerden, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorFriesen, Nikolai
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:06:43Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:06:43Z-
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.issn00244074
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/7525-
dc.description.abstractWe hypothesized that the spatial pattern of genetic variation in different ecological groups of steppe plant species is not similar. To test this hypothesis, we studied genetic variation of the typical steppe plant Goniolimon speciosum (Plumbaginaceae), which is spread across the whole of the Asian steppe, and compared it with the published data on genetic variation of several mountain-steppe species. To elucidate the phylogenetic position of and genetic structure in G. speciosum, we sequenced the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and plastid trnH-psbA and trnQ-rps16 regions. Goniolimon speciosum was shown to have originated in Central Asia in the Pliocene. We revealed two genetic groups in G. speciosum: a south-eastern (Dahuria, north-eastern Mongolia, southern shore of the lake Baikal and eastern Tyva) group and a broadly distributed western group. This split of evolutionary lineages is estimated to have occurred in the mid-Pliocene. Some samples from the central part of the species area (riverheads of Yenisei and Ob) formed an intermediate genetic group, where most plants had western ITS ribotypes and southeastern plastid haplotypes. This polyphyletic group could have originated due to multiple secondary contacts and subsequent hybridization events. The geographically structured genetic subdivision of the western lineage, based on the ITS data, indicates multiple northward colonizations of G. speciosum from Central Asia that occurred, according to our estimates, in the early Pleistocene. Thus, the history of steppe vegetation is more complicated than has been previously suggested, basing upon limited taxonomic sampling of steppe plants. Species with different ecological preferences have a different history.
dc.description.sponsorshipRussian Foundation for Basic ResearchRussian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) [152902486]; We thank Nelli Pazdnikova for help in the field and for her hospitality, Maksim Grigoryan for help in the laboratory and all the collectors listed in Appendix 1. Molecular analysis was performed in the laboratory of Main Botanical Garden (Moscow) and the head of the laboratory, Ivan Shanzer, is greatly acknowledged. Some sampling was done on the territory of Daurskij and Altachejskij nature reserves and we thank their staff for the support. We thank Lucille Schmieding for correcting the English. Financial support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project 152902486) is highly appreciated.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESS
dc.relation.ispartofBOTANICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY
dc.subjectANGIOSPERMS
dc.subjectBIOGEOGRAPHY
dc.subjectdivergence time estimates
dc.subjectDNA-SEQUENCES
dc.subjectEurasian steppe formation
dc.subjectGENUS
dc.subjecthistorical biogeography
dc.subjectMODEL
dc.subjectphylogeny
dc.subjectPLANT
dc.subjectPlant Sciences
dc.subjectTORTOISE
dc.titleGenetic variation in Goniolimon speciosum (Plumbaginaceae) reveals a complex history of steppe vegetation
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.isiISI:000400595500008
dc.description.volume184
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.startpage113
dc.description.endpage121
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-3534-5792
dc.contributor.researcheridAAO-5116-2020
dc.contributor.researcheridT-8478-2017
dc.identifier.eissn10958339
dc.publisher.placeGREAT CLARENDON ST, OXFORD OX2 6DP, ENGLAND
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationBot. J. Linnean Soc.
crisitem.author.deptFB 05 - Biologie/Chemie-
crisitem.author.deptidfb05-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-3547-3257-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidFrNi535-
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