Disclosure of sensitive behaviors across self-administered survey modes: a meta-analysis

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGnambs, Timo
dc.contributor.authorKaspar, Kai
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:06:56Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:06:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1554351X
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/7626-
dc.description.abstractIn surveys, individuals tend to misreport behaviors that are in contrast to prevalent social norms or regulations. Several design features of the survey procedure have been suggested to counteract this problem; particularly, computerized surveys are supposed to elicit more truthful responding. This assumption was tested in a meta-analysis of survey experiments reporting 460 effect sizes (total N = 125,672). Self-reported prevalence rates of several sensitive behaviors for which motivated misreporting has been frequently observed were compared across self-administered paper-and-pencil versus computerized surveys. The results revealed that computerized surveys led to significantly more reporting of socially undesirable behaviors than comparable surveys administered on paper. This effect was strongest for highly sensitive behaviors and surveys administered individually to respondents. Moderator analyses did not identify interviewer effects or benefits of audio-enhanced computer surveys. The meta-analysis highlighted the advantages of computerized survey modes for the assessment of sensitive topics.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute on Drug AbuseUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)European Commission [DA01411]; Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality [283-2004-00022]; NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSEUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)European Commission [R01DA001411] Funding Source: NIH RePORTER; We are grateful to Robert Klimanek and Jennifer Lindzus for their aid during the coding process. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey was conducted by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Monitoring the Future study was supported by a grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (DA01411), and the National Survey on Drug Use and Health was supported by the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (283-2004-00022). Neither of the study sponsors had any role in the study design, analysis, interpretation, or writing of this paper.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.relation.ispartofBEHAVIOR RESEARCH METHODS
dc.subjectComputer
dc.subjectDATA-COLLECTION MODE
dc.subjectDRUG-USE DATA
dc.subjectFILE-DRAWER PROBLEM
dc.subjectINTERNET IDENTIFICATION
dc.subjectPAPER-AND-PENCIL
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental
dc.subjectPsychology, Mathematical
dc.subjectPUBLICATION BIAS
dc.subjectRISK BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectSelf-disclosure
dc.subjectSensitive question
dc.subjectSEXUAL-BEHAVIOR
dc.subjectSOCIAL DESIRABILITY BIAS
dc.subjectSUBSTANCE USE
dc.subjectSurvey
dc.titleDisclosure of sensitive behaviors across self-administered survey modes: a meta-analysis
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.3758/s13428-014-0533-4
dc.identifier.isiISI:000364511400025
dc.description.volume47
dc.description.issue4
dc.description.startpage1237
dc.description.endpage1259
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-6984-1276
dc.contributor.researcheridI-8353-2014
dc.identifier.eissn15543528
dc.publisher.place233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationBehav. Res. Methods
dcterms.oaStatusBronze
crisitem.author.netidKaKa001-
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