Are switches in perception of the Necker cube related to eye position?

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEinhauser, W
dc.contributor.authorMartin, KAC
dc.contributor.authorKonig, P
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:07:09Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:07:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.issn0953816X
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/7727-
dc.description.abstractThe issue of the relation of eye position to perceptual reversals of the ambiguous figure of the `Necker cube' dates back to Necker's original article [L.A. Necker (1832) The London & Edinburgh Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, 1, 329-337]. Despite the investigations of many distinguished psychophysicists since then, the question of whether perceptual switching is a cause or a consequence of associated changes in eye position has remained a matter of debate. In the present study we overcame methodological problems that have bedevilled many previous studies. We avoided any instruction that could interfere with the human subjects' free viewing of the Necker cube, tracked the eye position precisely and used biased versions of the cube that produced unambiguous percepts to determine how each subject actually looked at the cube. We show that, under these free-viewing conditions, there is a close link between the perception of the Necker cube and eye position. The average eye position of most subjects is at an extreme value at about the time when the subject's perception switches. From the biased cube trials we can infer that the polarity of the extreme corresponds to the percept which the subject had before the switch. These data indicate a bidirectional coupling between eye position and perceptual switching so that, after a subject's perceptual state changes, their eye position shifts to view the newly established percept. When the eye position approaches the corresponding extreme, the percept, in turn, becomes more and more likely to switch. This result suggests that the changed eye position itself might provide a negative feedback signal that suppresses the percept.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectMOVEMENTS
dc.subjectNeurosciences
dc.subjectNeurosciences & Neurology
dc.subjectovert attention
dc.subjectperceptual rivalry
dc.subjectPSYCHOPHYSICS
dc.titleAre switches in perception of the Necker cube related to eye position?
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1460-9568.2004.03722.x
dc.identifier.isiISI:000225150900031
dc.description.volume20
dc.description.issue10
dc.description.startpage2811
dc.description.endpage2818
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-3654-5267
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-7516-9589
dc.contributor.researcheridABB-2380-2020
dc.contributor.researcheridA-3041-2012
dc.identifier.eissn14609568
dc.publisher.place111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationEur. J. Neurosci.
crisitem.author.deptInstitut für Kognitionswissenschaft-
crisitem.author.deptFB 05 - Biologie/Chemie-
crisitem.author.deptidinstitute28-
crisitem.author.deptidfb05-
crisitem.author.orcid0000-0003-3654-5267-
crisitem.author.parentorgFB 08 - Humanwissenschaften-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.grandparentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidKoPe298-
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