The Role of Gamma-Band Activity in the Representation of Faces: Reduced Activity in the Fusiform Face Area in Congenital Prosopagnosia

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDobel, Christian
dc.contributor.authorJunghoefer, Markus
dc.contributor.authorGruber, Thomas
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:07:49Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:07:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn19326203
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/8071-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Congenital prosopagnosia (CP) describes an impairment in face processing that is presumably present from birth. The neuronal correlates of this dysfunction are still under debate. In the current paper, we investigate high-frequent oscillatory activity in response to faces in persons with CP. Such neuronal activity is thought to reflect higher-level representations for faces. Methodology: Source localization of induced Gamma-Band Responses (iGBR) measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) was used to establish the origin of oscillatory activity in response to famous and unknown faces which were presented in upright and inverted orientation. Persons suffering from congenital prosopagnosia (CP) were compared to matched controls. Principal Findings: Corroborating earlier research, both groups revealed amplified iGBR in response to upright compared to inverted faces predominately in a time interval between 170 and 330 ms and in a frequency range from 50-100 Hz. Oscillatory activity upon known faces was smaller in comparison to unknown faces, suggesting a ``sharpening'' effect reflecting more efficient processing for familiar stimuli. These effects were seen in a wide cortical network encompassing temporal and parietal areas involved in the disambiguation of homogenous stimuli such as faces, and in the retrieval of semantic information. Importantly, participants suffering from CP displayed a strongly reduced iGBR in the left fusiform area compared to control participants. Conclusions: In sum, these data stress the crucial role of oscillatory activity for face representation and demonstrate the involvement of a distributed occipito-temporo-parietal network in generating iGBR. This study also provides the first evidence that persons suffering from an agnosia actually display reduced gamma band activity. Finally, the results argue strongly against the view that oscillatory activity is a mere epiphenomenon brought fourth by rapid eye-movements (micro saccades).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherPUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE
dc.subjectACTIVATION
dc.subjectATTENTION
dc.subjectBRAIN
dc.subjectEEG
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subjectNEURAL MECHANISMS
dc.subjectPARIETAL CORTEX
dc.subjectRECOGNITION
dc.subjectREPETITION
dc.subjectRESPONSES
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subjectSYNCHRONY
dc.titleThe Role of Gamma-Band Activity in the Representation of Faces: Reduced Activity in the Fusiform Face Area in Congenital Prosopagnosia
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0019550
dc.identifier.isiISI:000290256400021
dc.description.volume6
dc.description.issue5
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-8532-2986
dc.contributor.researcheridAAA-2892-2021
dc.publisher.place1160 BATTERY STREET, STE 100, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94111 USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationPLoS One
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Submitted, Green Published, gold
crisitem.author.deptFB 08 - Humanwissenschaften-
crisitem.author.deptidfb08-
crisitem.author.parentorgUniversität Osnabrück-
crisitem.author.netidGrTh192-
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