Continuity and Change in Social-ecological Systems: the Role of Institutional Resilience

Autor(en): Herrfahrdt-Paehle, Elke
Pahl-Wostl, Claudia 
Stichwörter: ADAPTABILITY; adaptation; BOUNDARIES; Ecology; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Environmental Studies; GOVERNANCE; institutions; persistence; PERSPECTIVE; resilience; SOUTH-AFRICA; TRANSFORMABILITY; transformation; water governance; WATER MANAGEMENT
Erscheinungsdatum: 2012
Herausgeber: RESILIENCE ALLIANCE
Journal: ECOLOGY AND SOCIETY
Volumen: 17
Ausgabe: 2
Zusammenfassung: 
In recent years recurring political, economic, and environmental crises require questioning and re-evaluating dominant pathways of human development. However, political and economic frameworks seem to encompass deeply rooted resistance to fundamental changes (e. g., global financial crisis, climate change negotiations). In an effort to repair the system as fast as possible, those paradigms, mechanisms, and structures that led into the crisis are perpetuated. Instead of preserving conventional patterns and focusing on continuity, crises could be used as an opportunity for learning, adapting, and entering onto more sustainable pathways. However, there are different ways not only of arguing for sustainable pathways of development but also of conceptualizing continuity and change. By focusing on institutions, we illustrate the tension between the concepts of continuity and change, how they interact, and how they build or degrade institutional resilience. The analysis draws on empirical research in South Africa and Uzbekistan, which were locked in persistent regimes over decades. Faced with the challenge to transform, Uzbekistan chose a pathway of institutional continuity, while South Africa opted for comprehensive reforms and a high level of change. Based on these case studies, we illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of institutional continuity and change. Elements of institutional continuity during times of transformation include preserving key institutions, which define how the rules are made; maintaining social memory; providing transparency of reform processes and allowing them time to take effect. Elements of institutional change required during phases of consolidation include flexible legislation; regular reviews; and adaptation of legislation during and after implementation.
ISSN: 17083087
DOI: 10.5751/ES-04565-170208

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