WHY DO THYLAKOID MEMBRANES FROM HIGHER-PLANTS FORM GRANA STACKS

Autor(en): TRISSL, HW
WILHELM, C
Stichwörter: ALGA; Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; EXCITATION-ENERGY TRANSFER; FREEZE-FRACTURE; FUCUS-SERRATUS; II REACTION CENTERS; MANTONIELLA-SQUAMATA PRASINOPHYCEAE; ORGANIZATION; PHOTOSYNTHETIC MEMBRANES; STOICHIOMETRY; SYSTEM-I
Erscheinungsdatum: 1993
Herausgeber: ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Journal: TRENDS IN BIOCHEMICAL SCIENCES
Volumen: 18
Ausgabe: 11
Startseite: 415
Seitenende: 419
Zusammenfassung: 
Chloroplasts contain a system of membrane sacs, the thylakoids, some of which are stacked to form grana (singular, granum), whereas others float freely in the stroma. It is on the thylakoid membranes that the electron carriers necessary for photosynthesis reside. There has been continuous speculation and discussion about the function of the grana ever since Menke postulated their lamellar nature in 1939. On the basis of new insights into the biophysics of the two photosystems and the molecular organization of thylakoid membranes of algae that exhibit a different lateral heterogeneity from that of higher plants, we propose that the membrane stacking found in the chloroplasts of higher plants and green algae is just one way in which Nature implements a general principle, namely that of physically separating a slow (PS II) and a fast (PS I) photosystem.
ISSN: 09680004
DOI: 10.1016/0968-0004(93)90136-B

Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric