Lipomatoses

Autor(en): Al Ghazal, Philipp
Groenemeyer, Lisa-Lena
Schoen, Michael P.
Stichwörter: AXONAL NEUROPATHY; BUFFALO HUMP; DERCUMS-DISEASE; Dermatology; DISEASE ADIPOSIS DOLOROSA; INTRACTABLE PAIN; INTRAVENOUS LIDOCAINE; MADELUNGS-DISEASE; MESSENGER-RNA; MITOCHONDRIAL DYSFUNCTION; MULTIPLE SYMMETRICAL LIPOMATOSIS
Erscheinungsdatum: 2018
Herausgeber: WILEY
Journal: JOURNAL DER DEUTSCHEN DERMATOLOGISCHEN GESELLSCHAFT
Volumen: 16
Ausgabe: 3
Startseite: 313
Seitenende: 328
Zusammenfassung: 
Lipomatoses are benign proliferations of adipose tissue, often with typical distribution patterns, which usually occur without clear causes. In contrast to circumscribed lipomas, they develop diffusely and symmetrically and are not surrounded by a fibrous pseudocapsule. The most common form is benign symmetric lipomatosis (BSL; Launois-Bensaude syndrome), of which four types are distinguished based on the distribution pattern of hyperplastic adipose tissue. The etiology and pathogenesis of the disease are still largely unknown, although some forms appear to have a hereditary basis or to be associated with increased alcohol consumption. In some cases, mitochondrial dysfunctions have been detected. Lipomatoses may be solitary, but may also be associated with other symptoms or illnesses (comorbidity). Effective drug therapies are not known, but surgical procedures can alleviate the symptoms. Lipomatosis dolorosa, which can be distinguished from BSL, occurs predominantly in middle-aged women and is characterized by proliferation of adipose tissue and severe pain in the affected areas. Various differential diagnoses and concomitant illnesses need to be considered, in particular depression. There are no evidence-based recommendations for therapy. Repetitive lidocaine infusions can achieve temporary improvement. Recurrence after surgical intervention is not uncommon, but long-term success is also possible.
ISSN: 16100379
DOI: 10.1111/ddg.13460

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