Protein conducting nanopores

Autor(en): Harsman, Anke
Krueger, Vivien
Bartsch, Philipp
Honigmann, Alf
Schmidt, Oliver
Rao, Sanjana
Meisinger, Christof
Wagner, Richard 
Stichwörter: ENDOPLASMIC-RETICULUM; ENVELOPE MEMBRANE; ESSENTIAL COMPONENT; IMPORT MACHINERY; INNER MEMBRANE; INTERMEMBRANE SPACE; OUTER MITOCHONDRIAL-MEMBRANE; Physics; Physics, Condensed Matter; PRECURSOR PROTEINS; PREPROTEIN TRANSLOCASE; TRANSIT PEPTIDES
Erscheinungsdatum: 2010
Herausgeber: IOP PUBLISHING LTD
Journal: JOURNAL OF PHYSICS-CONDENSED MATTER
Volumen: 22
Ausgabe: 45
Zusammenfassung: 
About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40(SC) as well as a mutant Tom40(SC) (S-54 -> E) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40(SC) corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40(SC) S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with (t) over bar (off) congruent to 1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40(SC) S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution ((t) over bar (1)(off) congruent to 0.4 ms; (t) over bar (2)(off) congruent to 4.6 ms).
ISSN: 09538984
DOI: 10.1088/0953-8984/22/45/454102

Show full item record

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric