Host-member misperceptions about what others expect of immigrants: The role of personal attitudes, voting behaviour, and right-wing authoritarianism

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeviston, Zoe
dc.contributor.authorCoenen, Jana M.
dc.contributor.authorDandy, Justine
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:09:55Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:09:55Z-
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn13672223
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/9056-
dc.description.abstractConcordant acculturation expectations and preferences between a host society and its immigrants are important for social cohesion. But perceptions of others' attitudes are often distorted, and may extend to intracultural misperceptions about what others in one's own society expect for immigrants. We test whether attitudinal misperceptions operate in the context of host-members' acculturation expectations of immigrants-preferences about whether newcomers should embrace the majority culture, or maintain their own cultural heritage. Further, we test whether the conservative dimension of right-wing authoritarianism (RWA-C) drives both personal acculturation expectations and distortions about what others expect. We surveyed a representative sample of 2,013 Australian citizens about their own acculturation expectations for immigrants and their perceptions of the expectations of the host society in general. People significantly overestimated the extent to which fellow host society members expect immigrants to embrace the host culture, and underestimated expectations that immigrants retain their own culture. Voting behaviour and RWA-C were related to personal acculturation expectations and to perceptions of host society consensus with their own views (self-other discrepancy). Moreover, personal acculturation expectations mediated the link between RWA-C and perceived self-other discrepancy. The psychological bases of these misperceptions, and their potential ramifications for immigrants, are discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipEdith Cowan University [G1003405]; This research was supported by Edith Cowan University (G1003405).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY
dc.relation.ispartofASIAN JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
dc.subjectACCULTURATION
dc.subjectANTECEDENT
dc.subjectFALSE-CONSENSUS
dc.subjectMAJORITY
dc.subjectMODERATING ROLE
dc.subjectMULTICULTURALISM
dc.subjectPERCEPTION
dc.subjectPLURALISTIC IGNORANCE
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Social
dc.subjectright-wing authoritarianism
dc.subjectsocial perception
dc.subjectSOCIAL-DOMINANCE ORIENTATION
dc.subjectSTRATEGIES
dc.subjectvoting behaviour
dc.titleHost-member misperceptions about what others expect of immigrants: The role of personal attitudes, voting behaviour, and right-wing authoritarianism
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ajsp.12418
dc.identifier.isiISI:000561001200001
dc.description.volume23
dc.description.issue4
dc.description.startpage397
dc.description.endpage406
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-3871-364X
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-4969-7916
dc.identifier.eissn1467839X
dc.publisher.place111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationAsian J. Soc. Psychol.
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Published
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