Farmland bird responses to land abandonment in Western Siberia

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKamp, Johannes
dc.contributor.authorReinhard, Aline
dc.contributor.authorFrenzel, Markus
dc.contributor.authorKaempfer, Steffen
dc.contributor.authorTrappe, Johanna
dc.contributor.authorHoelzel, Norbert
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:10:14Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:10:14Z-
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn01678809
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/9233-
dc.description.abstractLand abandonment is an important driver of biodiversity changes. Nearly 60 million ha of cropland and huge areas of managed grassland were abandoned after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We compared community structure and abundances of farmland birds on used and abandoned cropland, pastures and hay meadows in a study area situated in the Western Siberian crop belt. Abandoned land hosted distinct communities of farmland birds that were similar to those of abandoned farmland elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. More species profited from abandonment than suffered, but the densities of a distinct group of `meadow birds', a group of high conservation concern in Eurasia, were lower on abandoned land compared to managed pastures and hay meadows. Abandoned land had taller, but not denser vegetation and higher plant litter cover than used pastures and hay meadows. The vegetation structure of abandoned land explained differences in bird abundance well, and responses to vegetation parameters were non-linear and species-specific. Future land-use trends are difficult to predict, but cropland recultivation and intensification seem likely. Conservation strategies should entail minimized reclamation of abandoned cropland (perhaps coupled with sustainable intensification on existing farmland), and low-input management of pastures and hay meadows. As a large proportion of the grassland is managed for subsistence farming, measures to slow down further rural human outmigration would also benefit bird biodiversity.
dc.description.sponsorshipGerman Government, Federal Ministry of Education and Research [01LL0906A]; This work was conducted as part of project SASCHA ('Sustainable land management and adaptation strategies to climate change for the Western Siberian grain belt'). We are grateful for funding by the German Government, Federal Ministry of Education and Research within their Sustainable Land Management funding framework (funding reference 01LL0906A). We thank Tobias Kiimmerle, Dmitry Shitikov and two anonymous reviewers for helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper and Lilia Martens for collecting the land-use statistics data.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherELSEVIER
dc.relation.ispartofAGRICULTURE ECOSYSTEMS & ENVIRONMENT
dc.subjectAGRICULTURAL CHANGE
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectAgriculture, Multidisciplinary
dc.subjectARABLE LAND
dc.subjectBIODIVERSITY
dc.subjectCONSERVATION
dc.subjectCropland
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectENVIRONMENTAL DYNAMICS
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences & Ecology
dc.subjectFIELDS
dc.subjectForest steppe
dc.subjectLivestock grazing
dc.subjectMeadow birds
dc.subjectRECULTIVATION
dc.subjectRUSSIA
dc.subjectSTEPPE
dc.subjectSustainable intensification
dc.subjectUSE INTENSITY
dc.titleFarmland bird responses to land abandonment in Western Siberia
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.agee.2018.09.009
dc.identifier.isiISI:000449450100008
dc.description.volume268
dc.description.startpage61
dc.description.endpage69
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-6367-3400
dc.contributor.researcheridH-8753-2013
dc.identifier.eissn18732305
dc.publisher.placeRADARWEG 29, 1043 NX AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationAgric. Ecosyst. Environ.
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