Niche overlap in allotopic and syntopic populations of sexually interacting ground-hopper species

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHochkirch, Axel
dc.contributor.authorGroening, Julia
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:10:51Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:10:51Z-
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn16729609
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/9417-
dc.description.abstractThere is accumulating evidence that sexual interactions among species (reproductive interference) could have dramatic effects for species coexistence. It has been shown that the fitness of individuals can be substantially reduced as a consequence of reproductive interference. This might subsequently lead to displacement of a species (sexual exclusion). On the other hand, some evolutionary and ecological mechanisms might enable species to coexist, such as the divergence of mate recognition systems (reproductive character displacement), habitat partitioning, clumped dispersion patterns or different colonization capabilities. We have previously shown that the two ground-hopper species Tetrix subulata and Tetrix ceperoi interact sexually in the laboratory as well as in the field. At sites where both species co-occur niche overlap was high, suggesting that coexistence is maintained by different niche breadths rather than by habitat partitioning. To test the hypothesis that habitat partitioning does not contribute to species coexistence, we examined whether allotopic and syntopic populations of these two species differ in niche overlap (competitive release). Our results show that niche overlap is higher in syntopic than in allotopic populations, suggesting that the site-specific habitat structure (heterogeneity) has a stronger influence on microhabitat utilization than the presence of heterospecifics. Hence, our data do not support the hypothesis that habitat partitioning plays a substantial role for the coexistence of these sexually interacting species.
dc.description.sponsorshipGradFoG, Reinhold-Tuxen-Gesellschaft e.V., Forschungspool of the University of Osnabruck; Foundation of Gerhard ten Doornkaat-Kohlmann; We are grateful to Kathrin A. Witzenberger for critical comments that helped to improve the manuscript. Gunter Grein and Henrich Klugkist provided information concerning the distribution of the investigated species. The fieldwork in Bremen was done during a students' course in behavioral ecology. The participants in 1998 were Michael Folger-Ruter, Iris Gehrken, Malte Gotz, Anke Gulau, Carola Harmuth, Frauke Hellwig, Andrea Intemann, Christian Keithahn, Stefan Lander, Helge Muhl, Udo Palckruhn, Melanie Papen, Andrea Peiter, Ole Rohlfs, Gitta Spiecker, Stefan Vogt, Marco Zimmermann and Marion Zimmermann. In 1999, the data were collected by Christoph Kulmann, Tamara Loos, Tede Lorenzen, Corinna Ahrensfeld, Anne Osburg, Maren Reichelt, Claudia Schluter and Maria Vassilakaki. The fieldwork on Langeoog was carried out by Sascha Krause and Judith Kochmann. At the Hase site, Alexander Finger, Niklas Lucke, Andreas Michalik and Felix Schaefer helped to collect data. Access to the study sites was kindly permitted by the district administration Weser-Ems (National Park Administration). Financial support was provided by research grants to J. Groning (GradFoG, Reinhold-Tuxen-Gesellschaft e.V., Forschungspool of the University of Osnabruck) and by the Foundation of Gerhard ten Doornkaat-Kohlmann (grants to S. Krause and J. Kochmann).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELL
dc.relation.ispartofINSECT SCIENCE
dc.subjectCEPEROI
dc.subjectCOEXISTENCE
dc.subjectcompetition
dc.subjectCOMPETITIVE-EXCLUSION
dc.subjectECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES
dc.subjectEntomology
dc.subjectINTERSPECIFIC INTERACTIONS
dc.subjectniche breadth
dc.subjectniche partitioning
dc.subjectPHYTOPHAGOUS INSECTS
dc.subjectPYGMY GRASSHOPPERS
dc.subjectREPRODUCTIVE INTERFERENCE
dc.subjectTETRIGIDAE
dc.subjectTETRIX-SUBULATA ORTHOPTERA
dc.titleNiche overlap in allotopic and syntopic populations of sexually interacting ground-hopper species
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1744-7917.2011.01462.x
dc.identifier.isiISI:000304346200012
dc.description.volume19
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.startpage391
dc.description.endpage402
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-4475-0394
dc.contributor.researcheridA-4092-2008
dc.contributor.researcheridE-7891-2011
dc.identifier.eissn17447917
dc.publisher.place111 RIVER ST, HOBOKEN 07030-5774, NJ USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationInsect Sci.
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