Risk and protective factors for mental health at a youth mass gathering

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCruwys, Tegan
dc.contributor.authorSaeri, Alexander K.
dc.contributor.authorRadke, Helena R. M.
dc.contributor.authorWalter, Zoe C.
dc.contributor.authorCrimston, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorFerris, Laura J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-23T16:10:58Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-23T16:10:58Z-
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn10188827
dc.identifier.urihttps://osnascholar.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/unios/9480-
dc.description.abstractBackgroundMass gatherings are well-documented for their public health risks; however, little research has examined their impact on mental health or focused on young people specifically. This study explores risk and protective factors for mental health at mass gatherings, with a particular focus on characterising attendees with high levels of psychological distress and risk taking.MethodData collection was conducted in situ at Schoolies, an annual informal week-long mass gathering of approximately 30,000 Australian school leavers. Participants were 812 attendees of Schoolies on the Gold Coast in 2015 or 2016 (74% aged 17years old).ResultsIn both years, attendee mental health was found to be significantly better than population norms for their age peers. Identification with the mass gathering predicted better mental health, and this relationship became stronger across the course of the mass gathering. Attendees with high levels of psychological distress were more likely to be male, socially isolated, impulsive, and in a friendship group where risk taking was normative.ConclusionsMass gatherings may have a net benefit for attendee mental health, especially for those attendees who are subjectively committed to the event. However, a vulnerable subgroup of attendees requires targeted mental health support.
dc.description.sponsorshipAustralian Research CouncilAustralian Research Council [DE160100592]; Safer Schoolies Initiative, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, Queensland Government; This Project was funded by the Australian Research Council (DE160100592) and the Safer Schoolies Initiative, Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services, Queensland Government. We wish to thank Melissa Chang, Tom Curro, Joanne Rathbone, Harrison Lee, Andrew Morgan, Alicia Federico, Anna Rogash, Jenna Laroque, Josh Santin, Nick Wheeler, Petra Harman-Schufft, Sienna Hinton, Taylor Alati, and Zoe Weller for their assistance with data collection and entry.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSPRINGER
dc.relation.ispartofEUROPEAN CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRY
dc.subjectAUSTRALIA
dc.subjectBEHAVIOR
dc.subjectCROWD
dc.subjectHealth risk behaviour
dc.subjectIDENTIFICATION
dc.subjectINTERVENTION
dc.subjectMass gathering medicine
dc.subjectNORMS
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental
dc.subjectSCHOOLIES WEEK
dc.subjectSocial identity
dc.subjectSOCIAL-IDENTITY
dc.subjectSpecial events
dc.subjectSUBSTANCE USE
dc.subjectWell-being
dc.subjectYOUNG-PEOPLE
dc.titleRisk and protective factors for mental health at a youth mass gathering
dc.typejournal article
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00787-018-1163-7
dc.identifier.isiISI:000457572400007
dc.description.volume28
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.startpage211
dc.description.endpage222
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0001-5296-3480
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-4529-786X
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-2127-1825
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-9451-1535
dc.contributor.researcheridG-2956-2014
dc.identifier.eissn1435165X
dc.publisher.place233 SPRING ST, NEW YORK, NY 10013 USA
dcterms.isPartOf.abbreviationEur. Child Adolesc. Psych.
dcterms.oaStatusGreen Submitted
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