Adhesive Mechanisms of Salmonella enterica

Autor(en): Wagner, Carolin
Hensel, Michael 
Herausgeber: Linke, D
Goldman, A
Stichwörter: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; BIOFILM FORMATION; Biology; COMPLETE GENOME SEQUENCE; FIBRONECTIN-BINDING PROTEIN; GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA; INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL-CELLS; Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics; Medicine, Research & Experimental; Microbiology; PATHOGENICITY ISLAND; Research & Experimental Medicine; SEROTYPE TYPHIMURIUM SHDA; SEROVAR TYPHIMURIUM; THIN AGGREGATIVE FIMBRIAE; TRANSMEMBRANE CONDUCTANCE REGULATOR
Erscheinungsdatum: 2011
Herausgeber: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN
Journal: BACTERIAL ADHESION: CHEMISTRY, BIOLOGY AND PHYSICS
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volumen: 715
Startseite: 17
Seitenende: 34
Zusammenfassung: 
Salmonella enterica is an invasive, facultative intracellular pathogen of animal and man with the ability to colonize various niches in diverse host organisms. The pathogenesis of infections by S. enterica requires adhesion to various host cell surfaces, and a large number of adhesive structures can be found. Depending on the serotype of S. enterica, gene clusters for more than 10 different fimbrial adhesins were identified, with type I fimbriae such as Fim, Lpf (long polar fimbriae), Tafi (thin aggregative fimbriae) or the type IV pili of serotype Typhi. In addition, autotransporter adhesins such as ShdA, MisL and SadA and the type I secreted large repetitive adhesins SiiE and BapA have been identified. Although the functions of many of the various adhesins are not well understood, recent studies show the specific structural and functional properties of Salmonella adhesins and how they act in concert with other virulence determinants. In this chapter, we describe the molecular characteristics of Salmonella adhesins and link these features to their multiple functions in infection biology.
ISBN: 9789400709393
ISSN: 00652598
DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-0940-9_2

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