Are all models susceptible to dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image? The moderating role of personality styles

Autor(en): Blasczyk-Schiep, Sybilla
Sokola, Kaja
Fila-Witecka, Karolina
Kazen, Miguel
Stichwörter: ANOREXIA-NERVOSA; Body image; BULIMIA-NERVOSA; CULTURAL EXPECTATIONS; DISORDERS; Eating disorders; FASHION MODELS; MEDIA; METAANALYSIS; Personality styles; Psychiatry; Self-regulation; THINNESS; WEIGHT; WOMEN
Erscheinungsdatum: 2016
Herausgeber: SPRINGER
Journal: EATING AND WEIGHT DISORDERS-STUDIES ON ANOREXIA BULIMIA AND OBESITY
Volumen: 21
Ausgabe: 2
Startseite: 211
Seitenende: 220
Zusammenfassung: 
We investigated dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image in relation to personality styles in a group of professional models. Dysfunctional cognitions in professional models (n = 43) and a control group (n = 43) were assessed with the `Eating Disorder Cognition Questionnaire' (EDCQ), eating attitudes with the `Eating Attitudes Test' (EAT), and personality with the `Personality Styles and Disorders Inventory' (PSDI-S). Models had higher scores than controls on the EDCQ and EAT and on nine scales of the PSDI-S. Moderation analyses showed significant interactions between groups and personality styles in predicting EDCQ scales: The ambitious/narcissistic style was related to ``negative body and self-esteem'', the conscientious/compulsive style to ``dietary restraint'', and the spontaneous/borderline style to ``loss of control in eating''. The results indicate that not all models are susceptible to dysfunctional cognitions about eating and body image. Models are at a higher risk of developing negative automatic thoughts and dysfunctional assumptions relating to body size, shape and weight, especially if they have high scores on the above personality styles.
ISSN: 11244909
DOI: 10.1007/s40519-015-0228-6

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