A new look at gamma? High- (> 60 Hz) gamma-band activity in cortical networks: Function, mechanisms and impairment

Autor(en): Uhlhaas, Peter J.
Pipa, Gordon 
Neuenschwander, Sergio
Wibral, Michael
Singer, Wolf
Stichwörter: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; Biophysics; BRAIN ACTIVITY; CAT VISUAL-CORTEX; Cognition; DEPENDENT NEURONAL OSCILLATIONS; Gamma; HIGH-FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS; IN-VITRO; LATERAL GENICULATE-NUCLEUS; Oscillations; Psychiatry; SHORT-TERM; SYNCHRONOUS OSCILLATIONS; Synchrony; THETA-OSCILLATIONS; WORKING-MEMORY
Erscheinungsdatum: 2011
Herausgeber: PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Journal: PROGRESS IN BIOPHYSICS & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
Volumen: 105
Ausgabe: 1-2
Startseite: 14
Seitenende: 28
Zusammenfassung: 
gamma-band oscillations are thought to play a crucial role in information processing in cortical networks. In addition to oscillatory activity between 30 and 60 Hz, current evidence from electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) and local-field potentials (LFPs) has consistently shown oscillations > 60 Hz (high gamma-band) whose function and generating mechanisms are unclear. In the present paper, we summarize data that highlights the importance of high gamma-band activity for cortical computations through establishing correlations between the modulation of oscillations in the 60-200 Hz frequency and specific cognitive functions. Moreover, we will suggest that high gamma-band activity is impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. In the final part of the paper, we will review physiological mechanisms underlying the generation of high gamma-band oscillations and discuss the functional implications of low vs. high gamma-band activity patterns in cortical networks. (C) 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
ISSN: 00796107
DOI: 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2010.10.004

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