Bacterial Unculturability and the Formation of Intercellular Metabolic Networks

Autor(en): Pande, Samay
Kost, Christian 
Stichwörter: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; COOPERATION; DIVERSITY; ESCHERICHIA-COLI; GLUTAMIC ACID; GROWTH; MICROBIAL EVOLUTION; Microbiology; MICROORGANISMS; NICHE-CONSTRUCTION; OXIDIZING BACTERIA; SYMBIOBACTERIUM-THERMOPHILUM
Erscheinungsdatum: 2017
Herausgeber: ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Enthalten in: TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY
Band: 25
Ausgabe: 5
Startseite: 349
Seitenende: 361
Zusammenfassung: 
The majority of known bacterial species cannot be cultivated under laboratory conditions. Here we argue that the adaptive emergence of obligate metabolic interactions in natural bacterial communities can explain this pattern. Bacteria commonly release metabolites into the external environment. Accumulating pools of extracellular metabolites create an ecological niche that benefits auxotrophic mutants, which have lost the ability to autonomously produce the corresponding metabolites. In addition to a diffusion-based metabolite transfer, auxotrophic cells can use contact-dependent means to obtain nutrients from other co-occurring cells. Spatial colocalisation and a continuous coevolution further increase the nutritional dependency and optimise fluxes through combined metabolic networks. Thus, bacteria likely function as networks of interacting cells that reciprocally exchange nutrients and biochemical functions rather than as physiologically autonomous units.
ISSN: 0966842X
DOI: 10.1016/j.tim.2017.02.015

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