Mycelium-Like Networks Increase Bacterial Dispersal, Growth, and Biodegradation in a Model Ecosystem at Various Water Potentials

Autor(en): Worrich, Anja
Koenig, Sara
Miltner, Anja
Banitz, Thomas
Centler, Florian
Frank, Karin 
Thullner, Martin
Harms, Hauke
Kaestner, Matthias
Wick, Lukas Y.
Stichwörter: Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; DECOMPOSITION; DEGRADATION; DESICCATION; Microbiology; MICROORGANISMS; MOTILITY; POLLUTANT-DEGRADING BACTERIA; POROUS SURFACE MODEL; RESPONSES; SOIL; TEMPERATURE
Erscheinungsdatum: 2016
Herausgeber: AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY
Journal: APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Volumen: 82
Ausgabe: 10
Startseite: 2902
Seitenende: 2908
Zusammenfassung: 
Fungal mycelia serve as effective dispersal networks for bacteria in water-unsaturated environments, thereby allowing bacteria to maintain important functions, such as biodegradation. However, poor knowledge exists on the effects of dispersal networks at various osmotic (Psi(o)) and matric (Psi(m)) potentials, which contribute to the water potential mainly in terrestrial soil environments. Here we studied the effects of artificial mycelium-like dispersal networks on bacterial dispersal dynamics and subsequent effects on growth and benzoate biodegradation at Delta Psi(o) and Delta Psi(m) values between 0 and -1.5 MPa. In a multiple-microcosm approach, we used a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged derivative of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a model organism and sodium benzoate as a representative of polar aromatic contaminants. We found that decreasing Delta Psi(o) and Delta Psi(m) values slowed bacterial dispersal in the system, leading to decelerated growth and benzoate degradation. In contrast, dispersal networks facilitated bacterial movement at Delta Psi(o) and Delta Psi(m) values between 0 and -0.5 MPa and thus improved the absolute biodegradation performance by up to 52 and 119% for Delta Psi(o) and Delta Psi(m), respectively. This strong functional interrelationship was further emphasized by a high positive correlation between population dispersal, population growth, and degradation. We propose that dispersal networks may sustain the functionality of microbial ecosystems at low osmotic and matric potentials.
ISSN: 00992240
DOI: 10.1128/AEM.03901-15

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