Therapy goals in outpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy or psychodynamic psychotherapy - necessary or irrelevant?

Autor(en): Schoettke, Henning
Sembill, Anja
Eversmann, Julia
Waldorf, Manuel 
Lange, Julia
Stichwörter: ``naturalistic'' psychotherapy research; BIT; cognitive behavior therapy; PERSONAL GOALS; psychodynamic psychotherapy; Psychology; Psychology, Clinical; treatment goals
Erscheinungsdatum: 2011
Herausgeber: HOGREFE & HUBER PUBLISHERS
Journal: ZEITSCHRIFT FUR KLINISCHE PSYCHOLOGIE UND PSYCHOTHERAPIE
Volumen: 40
Ausgabe: 4
Startseite: 257
Seitenende: 266
Zusammenfassung: 
Background: Potential differences between cognitive-behavioral (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies concerning the quantity and focus of treatment goals are analyzed by using The Bern Inventory of Treatment Goals (BIT-T). Objective: The first aim was to examine the accordance with treatment goals between patients and therapists. Secondly it was intended to check the modelling of therapists' treatment goals regarding their theoretical orientation (CBT vs. PDT). Finally the association of treatment goal formulation with treatment success was investigated. Methods: Treatment goals of 472 patients and 283 CBT and 189 PT have been coded with The Berne Inventory of Treatment Goals (BIT-T). Treatment success was assessed by the Questionnaire for the Evaluation of Psychotherapy (FEP). Results: The interrater reliability of the BIT-T was proven to be good to very good. There was no significant congruence between patients' and therapists' treatment goals. CBT therapists significantly differ from PDT therapists regarding their treatment goals. Symptom- as well as problem-related goals showed a significant correlation with treatment success. Conclusion: The attention to treatment goals should be considered as a relevant factor when discussing treatment quality and success.
ISSN: 16163443
DOI: 10.1026/1616-3443/a000123

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