Proteomes of Host Cell Membranes Modified by Intracellular Activities of Salmonella enterica

Autor(en): Vorwerk, Stephanie
Krieger, Viktoria
Deiwick, Joerg
Hensel, Michael 
Hansmeier, Nicole
Stichwörter: Biochemical Research Methods; Biochemistry & Molecular Biology; CONTAINING VACUOLES; DATABASE; DYNAMICS; EFFECTOR PROTEIN; F-ACTIN; III SECRETION SYSTEM; INDUCED FILAMENTS; INVASION; PATHOGENICITY ISLAND-2; RAB GTPASES
Erscheinungsdatum: 2015
Herausgeber: AMER SOC BIOCHEMISTRY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY INC
Journal: MOLECULAR & CELLULAR PROTEOMICS
Volumen: 14
Ausgabe: 1
Startseite: 81
Seitenende: 92
Zusammenfassung: 
Intracellular pathogens need to establish a growth-stimulating host niche for survival and replication. A unique feature of the gastrointestinal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is the creation of extensive membrane networks within its host. An understanding of the origin and function of these membranes is crucial for the development of new treatment strategies. However, the characterization of this compartment is very challenging, and only fragmentary knowledge of its composition and biogenesis exists. Here, we describe a new proteome-based approach to enrich and characterize Salmonella-modified membranes. Using a Salmonella mutant strain that does not form this unique membrane network as a reference, we identified a high-confidence set of host proteins associated with Salmonella-modified membranes. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to reconstruct the interactions of Salmonella with host membranes. For example, we noted that Salmonella redirects endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane trafficking to its intracellular niche, a finding that has not been described for Salmonella previously. Our system-wide approach therefore has the potential to rapidly close gaps in our knowledge of the infection process of intracellular pathogens and demonstrates a hitherto unrecognized complexity in the formation of Salmonella host niches.
ISSN: 15359476
DOI: 10.1074/mcp.M114.041145

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